Father Joker

By Fr Joseph Panabang SVD

Mag-Beer Muna Tayo

His name is George but I have forgotten his surname. He was a police inspector, and his most tedious work which he dreaded most was autopsy. In a big hospital in Kumasi, regional capital of Ashante Region, he was describing in vivid detail his horrible experience in one of the morgues where 20 to 30 cadavers were just lined up waiting to be claimed. He was once called to identify a corpse. He went around the different rooms, squeezing in his feet between corpses lined up one after the other.

By Fr Joseph Panabang SVD

Too Late, Baby!

In Rome the hotel manager directed me to the restaurant stated on my plane ticket. The waiter handed me the menu: soupe aux legumes; spaghetti au jus de viande; bistek aux tomates et all. Among the names of dishes, I recognized only one, the word “spaghetti”. So I ordered spaghetti. I ordered the same food for each meal. For my last meal, I was tired of ordering spaghetti. So I went through the menu again and to my surprise at the back of it was the English translation of all the dishes. Too late baby.

By Fr Joseph Panabang SVD

Somo wrestler

During one of my home leave vacations, Fr. Jake Ferrer, SVD of Pangasinan also came for his vacation from Japan to Christ the King Seminary, Manila. Looking almost like a Somo wrestler, an official at the customs counter in the airport said, “Aba, itong Hapon, marunong magtagalog.”

By Fr Joseph Panabang SVD

By Father Joseph D. Panabang, SVD

Speaking in Tongue

Sometimes some of the gifts of the of the Holy Spirit are too earnestly sought for. To some of To some of Charisma tics, anybody who does not speak in tongues second class Catholics. This causing division and arguments rather n than fostering unity. Once I saw one of these charismatic leaders I suddenly (in an exaggerated manner) dropped my hand and stated trembling a little and prayed “Ave Maria napnoka iti gracia, ni Apo Dois Adda kenka...”

By Fr Joseph Panabang SVD

Mistaken Identity

Mr. William Opare, in-charge of Entertainment Club of Kintampo Rural Health Training School, came to invite me for a talk. “Where is Fr. Joe?” he asked. “Oh, do you have any message for him? I can give it to him.” Innocently, he gave me the message after which we continued talking about Fr. Joe. He assured me he would follow-up the invitation the following day. When he came back, he asked again, “Is Fr. Joe in?” “Yes.” “Where is he?” “Infront of you. Lucky you did not say anything bad about him the last time.” I said laughing.

By Fr Joseph Panabang SVD

Hey Daddy!

In some villages in southern Ghana, our Filipinos workers who used to pass by there were annoyed by many mestisos and mestisas calling to them, “Dad Dad, why? why did you leave me and my mother?” Private investigations were made and it was found out that those villages along the roads were constructed by foreign contractors a few years back. Yes, really Dad, why did you leave them?

By Fr Joseph Panabang SVD

Which Finger to Keep

When the Gonja people accosted me and wanted to kill me for helping a Konkomba man escape, one shouted from the crowd, “Cut off three of his fingers!” When I heard this, I could not decide which of my fingers to offer to the knife.

By Fr Joseph Panabang SVD

Classroom Setting 
Guavas in Africa

The guavas were ripe. I had plenty in my garden. While checking the attendance, I told my catechumens, “If your name is called, come first for your catechumen card then go for your guava.” Somewhere at the middle when called went straight to the guava forgetting his card. We all laughed.

By Fr Joseph Panabang SVD

Royal Taster

Fr. Augustine Villanueva, SVD from Baguio City, and our Acting Provincial Superior stopped at Kintampo. During breakfast, we were not sure whether the cheese was still good or not. “Let me taste it first,” I asked. I took first one piece, then another bigger piece, to which Gus remarked, “And what is that second piece for?” “The first is to taste it; the second is to confirm it.” Seeing how much the cheese had diminished, he raised an unbelieving eyebrow.

By Fr Joseph Panabang SVD

Proud Pajamas

At Kwabea Village, we were just starting the Mass when the Church president came in looking proud in his new stripped pajamas. For him, there is no difference between pajamas and ordinary pants. And, why should there be? Afterall, pajamas have always been daytime wear to both women and men in the Middle East. It was the westerners who adapted it for night wear. Maybe they smile when we go to bed in daytime clothes.

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